To Create Regular expression in QTP

Ways To Create Regular expression in QTP
In QTP, there are multiple ways to create Regular Expressions. Below are most common 15 different ways to create Regular Expressions:
1.Using the Backslash Character: A backslash (\) can serve two purposes. It can be used in conjunction with a special character to indicate that the next character be treated as a literal character. For example, \. would be treated as period (.) instead of a wildcard. Alternatively, if the backslash (\) is used in conjunction with some characters that would otherwise be treated as literal characters, such as the letters n, t, w, or d, the combination indicates a special character. For example, \n stands for the newline character.
2.Matching Any Single Character: A period (.) instructs QTP to search for any single character (except for \n).
3.Matching Any Single Character in a List: Square brackets instruct QTP to search for any single character within a list of characters.
4.Matching Any Single Character Not in a List: When a caret (^) is the first character inside square brackets, it instructs QTP to match any character in the list except for the ones specified in the string.
5.Matching Any Single Character within a Range: To match a single character within a range, you can use square brackets ([ ]) with the hyphen (-) character.
6.Matching Zero or More Specific Characters: An asterisk (*) instructs QTP to match zero or more occurrences of the preceding character.
7.Matching One or More Specific Characters: A plus sign (+) instructs QTP to match one or more occurrences of the preceding character.
8.Matching Zero or One Specific Character: A question mark (?) instructs QTP to match zero or one occurrences of the preceding character.
9.Grouping Regular Expressions: Parentheses (()) instruct QTP to treat the contained sequence as a unit, just as in mathematics and programming languages. Using groups is especially useful for delimiting the argument(s) to an alternation operator ( | ) or a repetition operator ( * , + , ? , { } ).
10.Matching One of Several Regular Expressions: A vertical line (|) instructs QTP to match one of a choice of expressions.
11.Matching the Beginning of a Line: A caret (^) instructs QTP to match the expression only at the start of a line, or after a newline character.
12.Matching the End of a Line: A dollar sign ($) instructs QTP to match the expression only at the end of a line, or before a newline character.
13.Matching Any AlphaNumeric Character Including the Underscore: \w instructs QTP to match any alphanumeric character and the underscore (A-Z, a-z, 0-9, _).
14.Matching Any Non-AlphaNumeric Character: \W instructs QTP to match any character other than alphanumeric characters and underscores.
15.Combining Regular Expression Operators: You can combine regular expression operators in a single expression to achieve the exact search criteria you need.

No comments:

 
Top Blogs