Winrunner interview

  1. What are the virtual objects and how do you learn them? - a) Applications may contain bitmaps that look and behave like GUI objects. WinRunner records operations on these bitmaps using win_mouse_click statements. By defining a bitmap as a virtual object, you can instruct WinRunner to treat it like a GUI object such as a push button, when you record and run tests.
    b) Using the Virtual Object wizard, you can assign a bitmap to a standard object class, define the coordinates of that object, and assign it a logical name.
    To define a virtual object using the Virtual Object wizard:
    i. Choose Tools > Virtual Object Wizard. The Virtual Object wizard opens. Click Next.
    ii. In the Class list, select a class for the new virtual object. If rows that are displayed in the window. For a table class, select the number of visible rows and columns. Click Next.
    iii. Click Mark Object. Use the crosshairs pointer to select the area of the virtual object. You can use the arrow keys to make precise adjustments to the area you define with the crosshairs. Press Enter or click the right mouse button to display the virtual object’s coordinates in the wizard. If the object marked is visible on the screen, you can click the Highlight button to view it. Click Next.
    iv.Assign a logical name to the virtual object. This is the name that appears in the test script when you record on the virtual object. If the object contains text that WinRunner can read, the wizard suggests using this text for the logical name. Otherwise, WinRunner suggests virtual_object, virtual_push_button, virtual_list, etc.
    v. You can accept the wizard’s suggestion or type in a different name. WinRunner checks that there are no other objects in the GUI map with the same name before confirming your choice. Click Next.
  2. H ow you created you test scripts 1) by recording or 2) programming? - a) Programming. I have done complete programming only, absolutely no recording.
  3. What are the two modes of recording? - a) There are 2 modes of recording in WinRunner
    i.Context Sensitive recording records the operations you perform on your application by identifying Graphical User Interface (GUI) objects.
    ii.Analog recording records keyboard input, mouse clicks, and the precise x- and y-coordinates traveled by the mouse pointer across the screen.
  4. What is a checkpoint and what are different types of checkpoints? - a) Checkpoints allow you to compare the current behavior of the application being tested to its behavior in an earlier version.
    You can add four types of checkpoints to your test scripts:
    i. GUI checkpoints verify information about GUI objects. For example, you can check that a button is enabled or see which item is selected in a list.
    ii. Bitmap checkpoints take a “snapshot” of a window or area of your application and compare this to an image captured in an earlier version.
    iii. Text checkpoints read text in GUI objects and in bitmaps and enable you to verify their contents.
    iv. Database checkpoints check the contents and the number of rows and columns of a result set, which is based on a query you create on your database.
  5. What is parameterizing? - a) In order for WinRunner to use data to drive the test, you must link the data to the test script which it drives. This is called parameterizing your test. The data is stored in a data table.
  6. How do you maintain the document information of the test scripts? - a) Before creating a test, you can document information about the test in the General and Description tabs of the Test Properties dialog box. You can enter the name of the test author, the type of functionality tested, a detailed description of the test, and a reference to the relevant functional specifications document.
  7. What do you verify with the GUI checkpoint for single property and what command it generates, explain syntax? - a) You can check a single property of a GUI object. For example, you can check whether a button is enabled or disabled or whether an item in a list is selected. To create a GUI checkpoint for a property value, use the Check Property dialog box to add one of the following functions to the test script:
    i. button_check_info
    ii. scroll_check_info
    iii. edit_check_info
    iv. static_check_info
    v. list_check_info
    vi. win_check_info
    vii. obj_check_info
    Syntax: button_check_info (button, property, property_value );
    edit_check_info ( edit, property, property_value );
  8. What do you verify with the GUI checkpoint for object/window and what command it generates, explain syntax? - a) You can create a GUI checkpoint to check a single object in the application being tested. You can either check the object with its default properties or you can specify which properties to check.
    b) Creating a GUI Checkpoint using the Default Checks
    i. You can create a GUI checkpoint that performs a default check on the property recommended by WinRunner. For example, if you create a GUI checkpoint that checks a push button, the default check verifies that the push button is enabled.
    ii. To create a GUI checkpoint using default checks:
  9. Choose Create > GUI Checkpoint > For Object/Window, or click the GUI Checkpoint for Object/Window button on the User toolbar. If you are recording in Analog mode, press the CHECK GUI FOR OBJECT/WINDOW softkey in order to avoid extraneous mouse movements. Note that you can press the CHECK GUI FOR OBJECT/WINDOW softkey in Context Sensitive mode as well. The WinRunner window is minimized, the mouse pointer becomes a pointing hand, and a help window opens on the screen. -
  10. Click an object. -
  11. WinRunner captures the current value of the property of the GUI object being checked and stores it in the test’s expected results folder. The WinRunner window is restored and a GUI checkpoint is inserted in the test script as an obj_check_gui statement - Syntax: win_check_gui ( window, checklist, expected_results_file, time );
    c) Creating a GUI Checkpoint by Specifying which Properties to Check
    d) You can specify which properties to check for an object. For example, if you create a checkpoint that checks a push button, you can choose to verify that it is in focus, instead of enabled.
    e) To create a GUI checkpoint by specifying which properties to check:
    i. Choose Create > GUI Checkpoint > For Object/Window, or click the GUI Checkpoint for Object/Window button on the User toolbar. If you are recording in Analog mode, press the CHECK GUI FOR OBJECT/WINDOW softkey in order to avoid extraneous mouse movements. Note that you can press the CHECK GUI FOR OBJECT/WINDOW softkey in Context Sensitive mode as well. The WinRunner window is minimized, the mouse pointer becomes a pointing hand, and a help window opens on the screen.
    ii. Double-click the object or window. The Check GUI dialog box opens.
    iii. Click an object name in the Objects pane. The Properties pane lists all the properties for the selected object.
    iv. Select the properties you want to check.
  12. To edit the expected value of a property, first select it. Next, either click the Edit Expected Value button, or double-click the value in the Expected Value column to edit it. -
  13. To add a check in which you specify arguments, first select the property for which you want to specify arguments. Next, either click the Specify Arguments button, or double-click in the Arguments column. Note that if an ellipsis (three dots) appears in the Arguments column, then you must specify arguments for a check on this property. (You do not need to specify arguments if a default argument is specified.) When checking standard objects, you only specify arguments for certain properties of edit and static text objects. You also specify arguments for checks on certain properties of nonstandard objects. -
  14. To change the viewing options for the properties of an object, use the Show Properties buttons. -
  15. Click OK to close the Check GUI dialog box. WinRunner captures the GUI information and stores it in the test’s expected results folder. The WinRunner window is restored and a GUI checkpoint is inserted in the test script as an obj_check_gui or a win_check_gui statement. - Syntax: win_check_gui ( window, checklist, expected_results_file, time );
    obj_check_gui ( object, checklist, expected results file, time );

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